Top Free-to-Play Monetization Tricks

The Coercive Monetization Model: how to extract money from Free-to-play gamers:

A coercive monetization model depends on the ability to “trick” a person into making a purchase with incomplete information, or by hiding that information Candy Crush: Sweet!such that while it is technically available, the brain of the consumer does not access that information.
… putting even one intermediate currency between the consumer and real money, such as a “game gem” (premium currency), makes the consumer much less adept at assessing the value of the transaction.

… To maximize the efficacy of a coercive monetization model, you must use a premium currency, ideally with the ability to purchase said currency in-app. Making the consumer exit the game to make a purchase gives the target’s brain more time to figure out what you are up to, lowering your chances of a sale.

… A game of skill is one where your ability to make sound decisions primarily determines your success. A money game is one where your ability to spend money is the primary determinant of your success. Consumers far prefer skill games to money games, for obvious reasons. A key skill in deploying a coercive monetization model is to disguise your money game as a skill game.

[Ramin Shokrizade @ Gamasutra]

Go read the full article, it’s brimming with mark-fleecing insight.

Via Boing Boing.

See also:

Dennis Eichhorn: How Sweet It Is

Ben Heck’s Raspberry Pi Gaming Console

This looks like fun:

Ben Heck Show: Portable Raspberry Pi Part 1

Via Revision 3

Via YouTube

Turn this:

Ben Heck Raspberry Pi Console project overview

Into this:

Ben Heck's Raspberry Pi Handheld Console

Using little more than a 3D printer and a £25 Raspberry Pi computer, he’s crafted the ultimate gaming handheld, a GameGear-style computer with gaming controls and an LCD screen which plays all of the classic arcade games from yesteryear, like Metal Slug and Contra.

“The Pi was fun, it’s a two sided 3D printed case, the 3D printer was great for it as it used different depths for different things,” he says. “The 3D printer helped me make a professionally looking case, and it only took around two hours to print each side.”

[Red Bull UK]

Via Slashdot:

Ben Heck makes a pointLegendary DIY gaming guru Ben Heck has given a new interview in which he talks about the Access Controller, his modular controller for consoles that lets disabled gamers play with one hand, and how he plans to update it for the next generation of consoles: ‘I’m sure I will. At the very least people are going to want the accessibility controllers I build … People have already asked about them for the next-gen consoles, and that was at E3. When I was there, the thing I looked at the most was the controllers. The Xbox One looks pretty similar to what we have at the moment, but they finally fixed the D-pad.’

[Slashdot]

See also Digital Trends:

Over the course of two 20-minutes episodes, Heckendorn shows us how to turn the 512MB Pi into a kick-ass, Linux-running portable computer that looks a bit like the GameBoy Advance. In Part One, he takes us along as he figures out how to combine the mini-computer that is the Raspberry Pi with a USB-powered Logitech gaming controller, as well as find a large enough battery pack to power both the Pi and an LCD screen that he pried from a backup camera from Amazon. He even maps the joystick controls to the Pi by using the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator, so that Pi will understand all your button combos in addition to your keyboard strokes.

Ben Heck with Raspberry Pi project components

But that’s not all. Heckendorn actually takes each device apart to save the components he needs inside a handheld console. For example, he removes the Ethernet adapter from the Raspberry Pi, but keeps the rumble pack from the controller before soldering all the disparate parts back together. At the same time, he’s also thinking about the shape of the device depending on the location of the batteries and buttons. By the end of this episode, we can already see a rough sketch of this Pi-powered console taking shape, right down to the locations of the screws.

[Gloria Sin @ Digital Trends]

What’s a Raspberry Pi?

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It’s a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays high-definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming.

The Model A will cost $25 USD and the Model B $35 USD, plus local taxes and shipping/handling fees.

Model A has 256MB RAM, one USB port and no Ethernet (network connection). Model B has 512MB RAM, 2 USB port and an Ethernet port.

[Raspberry Pi Frequently Asked Questions]

Buy Raspberry Pi