Algorithm Writes “Artspeak”

This has a playful spirit which may be of interest to game designers:

Istanbul-based artist Selçuk Artut has created a machine-learning algorithm which generates “Artspeak” — synthetic artist statements.

Molly Gottschalk has written an article about Artut. Excerpt:

The project has its roots in 2013, when Artut was writing his Ph.D. dissertation on the philosophies of Martin Heidegger, and found himself struggling to get through the philosopher’s difficult 1927 magnum opus, Being and Time. (One Amazon reviewer describes the book as ideas “buried beneath an impenetrable barrier of incomprehensible jargon.”)

But it wasn’t until this past summer when Artut, who often uses coding as a tool for his artistic practice, took online courses on machine learning and machine intelligence from Stanford University and became inspired to apply the technology to his work. He would, he decided, “teach the machine to think like Heidegger.”

Artut trained a computer with the text from Being and Time. The resulting algorithm formulates Heidegger’s words and ontological paradigms into three-sentence-long statements that sound all too similar to art world gibberish.

See:

* This New Algorithm Writes Perfect “Artspeak” By Molly Gottschalk
* selcukartut.com

Quasi-Objects of Lorenzo Oggiano

“La vita è un processo reale e autonomo indipendente da qualsiasi specifica manifestazione materiale.”*
— Lorenzo Oggiano

Quasi-objects of Lorenzo Oggiano

“Quasi-Objects” regards data actualization, the production of biologically non-functional organisms and ecosystems as transient output of an operative practice: aesthetics of process…

lorenzooggiano.net

I find these forms entirely fascinating, and practically begging for game design applications.

The forms are computer generated. I have no further details, nothing about the software involved. But just from looking at these still photos, I can see algorithms at play which would make a terrific Boss Battle in a first-person shooter … The Blob meets The Matrix ….

Somebody ought to make a game based on these principles. They really should. I would pay to play such a game, and then pay more for the source code.

Via Boing Boing, via but does it float.


* “Life is a real and autonomous process independent from any specific material manifestation.”

Where do good game ideas come from?

Kandinsky MarioKeith Stuart recently posted a wide range of answers to the question of where good game ideas come from. Excerpt:

Art has proved a fecund source of game ideas. Tetsuya Mizuguchi was inspired by Russian artist Wassily Kandinsky to create Rez; Ken Levine drew on the Art Deco movement for Bioshock; Uncharted co-lead designer Richard Lemarchand looked at the works of Victorian painters such as David Roberts and Caspar David Friedrich for the exotic locations that Nathan Drake discovers. And countless dungeon designers have looked at the complex works of MC Escher and Giovanni Battista Piranesi for their labyrinthine environments.

Keith Stuart @ The Guardian

Soft Guerilla

Kyle Bean : Knuckle DusterKyle Bean has created a series of “weapons made from harmless materials” for CUT magazine.

These images have a playful quality — playful about violence — which makes me think about game design, and the pleasures of violent videogames.

CUT magazine: ‘Soft Guerilla’

A series of weapons made from harmless materials for a feature article centred around the topic of ‘Guerilla Gardening’ and ‘Yarn Bombing’.

Photography: Sam Hofman

Kyle Bean

Meatcraft: A Real World Minecraft Art Gallery

Meatcraft was a real world art installation by Jeffrey Kam and Cody McCabe, presented at San Jose State University from March 14-17, 2011.

Meatcraft

MeatcraftThe show consisted of a minecraft themed gallery, complete with 2 crafting tables, tools, working LED torches, a creeper costume that greeted you at the door, and a fully interactive grass block world in the center. The wall textures, the crafting tables and the center grass block are all to scale (1 meter cubes), to increase immersion and really make you feel like you’re in Minecraft. Clearly the possibilities for a project like this are endless so it was extremely difficult for us not to pursue other ideas we had (Steve costume, pigs, cows, music, automatic day/night cycle, minecarts etc.). For purposes of time and budget, we had to restrict ourselves from getting too crazy.

realworldminecraft.com

Via Rock, Paper, Shotgun.

Motorcycles out of watch parts

These lovely objects belong in a game somewhere. They really do:

motorcycles out of watch parts, by dkart71

motorcycles out of watch parts by dkart71

Someone, please, make a game where the player constructs a motorcycle made out of watch parts, and then rides to safety:

  • Shrink the player until a wristwatch is the right size for motorcycle parts
  • Drop the player into a magical (high-tech, alien, etc.) wristwatch factory
  • — My person favorite: neo-retro Evil Nazi wristwatch factory
  • Remind the player that watch parts can be assembled into motorcycles
  • Sound the burglar alarm
  • Start winding up the clockwork watchmen, make it loud
  • Remind the player that watchmen are dangerous, and motorcycles go faster than watchmen
  • Every so often, wind up more clockwork watchmen, as incentive for the player to finish that motorcycle ….

If the player doesn’t build a motorcycle in time … well, bad things probably happen … if it were my Evil Nazi Wristwatch factory, I would release the Giant Wind-Up Chattering Teeth … but you have your own kind of fun, and be sure to let me know about it, I’ll award you the Handy Vandal Medal of Supreme Coolness.

Via Boing Boing.

Obsolete

Obsolete by Paul Hynek

Obsolete (2006)

This belongs in a game somewhere. It really does.

Pawel Hynek’s 2006 image “Obsolete” depicts a homeless robot begging for electrical power; it’s striking and funny as well as a little uncomfortable-making.

Cory Doctorow @ Boing Boing

I’m reminded of William Gibson’s novel Mona Lisa Overdrive, where we encounter The Finn (a character from earlier Gibson novels) now incarnated as a back-alley machine personality construct:
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